All posts by Alzforum

More Evidence That Distinct Tau Strains May Cause Different Tauopathies

From corticobasal degeneration to frontotemporal dementia, tauopathies come in many guises. How disruptions in a single protein cause such varied diseases remains a mystery. Results from a new study support the idea that unique conformations of misfolded tau may be to blame. Researchers led by Marc Diamond of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center […]

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ALS/MND 2015: 26th International Symposium on ALS/Motor Neurone Disease

At the International Symposium on ALS/MND in Orlando, Florida, scientists, neurologists, and people with ALS were excited to hear about clinical progress to treat motor-neuron disease. Attendees pondered the preliminary, but positive, results of gene therapy trials in spinal muscular atrophy—results that may open the door for similar gene therapy in ALS. They heard news […]

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10th Brain Research Conference: RNA Metabolism in Neurological Disease

At the 10th Brain Research Conference: RNA Metabolism in Neurological Disease, a satellite of the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, attendees learned about a parade of mice modeling different aspects of ALS and FTD that result from expansions in the C9ORF72 gene. Knockouts lose control of their immune systems, while transgenics overexpressing the repeat-heavy human […]

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SfN 2015: Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting

Some 29,000 registrants descended on McCormick Place, the largest convention center in the United States, for the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, held October 17-21 near downtown Chicago. Among the 18 symposia, 31 minisymposia, 98 nanosymposia, 650 poster sessions, and numerous special lectures was a shrinking but still lively fraction of Alzheimer’s science. Alzforum reporters […]

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ICFTD 2014: Collaborations Abound at the International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementias

First results from the Genetic frontotemporal dementia (FTD) Initiative, and the advance of an HDAC inhibitor drug into Phase 2, made big splashes at the International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementias (ICFTD) conference held last month in Vancouver. Five hundred and ninety scientists from 30 countries met to exchange the latest clinical and scientific news on […]

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ALS/MND 2012: Conference Coverage from the International Symposium on ALS/MND

Read the full coverage brought to you as part of Prize4Life’s collaboration with Alzforum: Part I: Chicago—ALS Database Opens for Business Part II: Chicago—ALS Protein SOD1 Painted as Disease Template Part III: Chicago—ALS Clinical Trials: New Hope After Phase 3 Setbacks Part IV: Chicago—Devilish Duo: Two Mutations Add Up to Familial ALS Part V: Chicago—Dynamic Repeats: C9ORF72 […]

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Frontotemporal Dementia Treatment: 2012 Study Group

Ironically, perhaps, progress in Alzheimer’s diagnosis—think CSF and amyloid PET—may boost the profile of other dementing diseases that are often misdiagnosed as AD in clinical practice. This has not gone unnoticed among researchers on frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). They are combining their newfound ability to definitively eliminate AD as a cause of a patient’s symptoms with significant […]

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Kiss of Life: Stem Cells Use Gap Junctions to Revive Neurons

Neuronal stem cells, originally viewed as a source of spare parts that would rebuild damaged circuits, are proving instead to function more like capable paramedics, coming to the rescue of degenerating neurons in multiple animal models of disease. How stem cells aid sick neurons is unclear, but in a paper to be published in PNAS online, […]

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SFN 2009: Chicago: New Technologies Help Drugs Cross Blood-Brain Barrier

It’s hard enough to make a drug that does the right thing. Designing compounds to fight neurodegenerative disease comes with the additional challenge of making sure they actually reach the brain. At the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting held 17-21 October 2009 in Chicago, a handful of groups tackled this “problem behind the problem” of […]

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