Bryologs at the Center of New Licensing Deal Between Neurotrope and Stanford

Neurotrope has closed an exclusive licensing deal with Stanford University for rights to develop bryostatin analogs, called “bryologs”, for applications in disorders of the central nervous system. Bryostatin, a natural product that is thought to inhibit PKC epsilon signaling, is currently in Phase II clinical trials by Neurotrope for treating Alzheimer’s disease. Neurotrope has now gained exclusive rights to make and sell a set of less complex chemical compounds with potential to mimic bryostatin’s activity, developed over the years in Paul Wenders’ laboratory at Stanford University. Neurotrope aims to advance a candidate bryolog-based therapy into clinical development by 2015.

Neurotrope has closed an exclusive licensing deal with Stanford University for rights to develop bryostatin analogs, called “bryologs”, for applications in disorders of the central nervous system. Bryostatin, a natural product that is thought to inhibit PKC epsilon signaling, is currently in Phase II clinical trials by Neurotrope for treating Alzheimer’s disease. Neurotrope has now gained exclusive rights to make and sell a set of less complex chemical compounds with potential to mimic bryostatin’s activity, developed over the years in Paul Wenders’ laboratory at Stanford University. Neurotrope aims to advance a candidate bryolog-based therapy into clinical development by 2015.

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