Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants May Slow Progression of Multiple Sclerosis

Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is the most common form of the autoimmune disease and is characterized by relapses of deteriorating neurological function. In a publication in the December 9 JAMA Neurology online, researchers from the Immune Tolerance Network reported interim results of a clinical trial of 24 patients treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HDIT/HCT). Three years after treatment, close to 80 percent of patients remained in remission and did not experience progression of their disease symptoms. An accompanying editorial suggests that this therapy may be particularly beneficial in patients who did not experience benefits with immunosuppressive treatment alone. These findings are of particular interest since similar approaches are being tested in ALS.

Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is the most common form of the autoimmune disease and is characterized by relapses of deteriorating neurological function. In a publication in the December 9 JAMA Neurology online, researchers from the Immune Tolerance Network reported interim results of a clinical trial of 24 patients treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HDIT/HCT). Three years after treatment, close to 80 percent of patients remained in remission and did not experience progression of their disease symptoms. An accompanying editorial suggests that this therapy may be particularly beneficial in patients who did not experience benefits with immunosuppressive treatment alone. These findings are of particular interest since similar approaches are being tested in ALS.

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disease-ms stem cells topic-clinical
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