Neuralstem CEO Celebrates Progress and Looks To the Future

Neuralstem’s CEO Richard Garr recently reflected on the substantial progress the company has made since embarking on a “journey … to find a potential treatment for ALS.” In his blog post, Garr commented on the presentation that Dr. Eva Feldman, principal investigator on the Neuralstem Phase I trial and the upcoming Phase II trial, gave at the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation’s Annual Congress in June. During her presentation Dr. Feldman chose to focus on the “remarkable surgical feat involved in this therapy”, which is often overlooked and “taken for granted.” For example there are extreme technical challenges involved with injecting stem cells into the spinal cord, in an area so small it is “the equivalent of hitting the chin on President Roosevelt’s face on [a] dime.” Also, Dr. Feldman spoke about the exciting expansion of the Phase II trial to include more patients who can be treated with “more cells” at two additional centers. Garr noted that “the FDA is getting comfortable with this ground breaking technology and totally new approach to treating this terrible disease.” Clearly great “progress” indeed.

Neuralstem’s CEO Richard Garr recently reflected on the substantial progress the company has made since embarking on a “journey … to find a potential treatment for ALS.” In his blog post, Garr commented on the presentation that Dr. Eva Feldman, principal investigator on the Neuralstem Phase I trial and the upcoming Phase II trial, gave at the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation’s Annual Congress in June. During her presentation Dr. Feldman chose to focus on the “remarkable surgical feat involved in this therapy”, which is often overlooked and “taken for granted.” For example there are extreme technical challenges involved with injecting stem cells into the spinal cord, in an area so small it is “the equivalent of hitting the chin on President Roosevelt’s face on [a] dime.” Also, Dr. Feldman spoke about the exciting expansion of the Phase II trial to include more patients who can be treated with “more cells” at two additional centers. Garr noted that “the FDA is getting comfortable with this ground breaking technology and totally new approach to treating this terrible disease.” Clearly great “progress” indeed.

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